Sites of Interest… or Not!

by Elizabeth Campbell

I was alerted to a new-to-me website this morning – one that mentions the Red River Colony. So, naturally, I went in to have a look!

by Elizabeth Campbell I was alerted to a new-to-me website this morning – one that mentions the Red River Colony. So, naturally, I went in to have a look!

Peter Rindisbacher 5

by Elizabeth Campbell
Peter Rindisbacher c. 1834. Self Portrait

Peter Rindisbacher c. 1834. Self Portrait

by Elizabeth Campbell Peter Rindisbacher set himself up in a studio in St. Louis Missouri during the latter years of his life. It was there that he earned a reputation as a miniature portrait artist. Although the image to the left is in black and white, there is a...

Peter Rindisbacher 4

by Elizabeth Campbell

A few more Rindisbachers related to the RRS:

Métis Family ca. 1826 (Bata Shoe Museum P80.982)

Métis Family ca. 1826 (Bata Shoe Museum P80.982)

 	Chippewa mode of traveling in spring and summer by Peter Rindisbacher c. 1825 (Virtual Museum of Canada)

Chippewa mode of traveling in spring and summer by Peter Rindisbacher c. 1825 (Virtual Museum of Canada; West Point Museum Art Collection)

by Elizabeth Campbell A few more Rindisbachers related to the RRS:

Peter Rindisbacher 3

by Elizabeth Campbell

Peter Rindisbacher was the first artist of European descent to portray the First Nations people of the Great Plains. He was meticulous in recording the detail of their garb and ornaments, and was recorded as painting very accurate likenesses, also.

by Elizabeth Campbell Peter Rindisbacher was the first artist of European descent to portray the First Nations people of the Great Plains. He was meticulous in recording the detail of their garb and ornaments, and was recorded as painting very accurate likenesses,...

Peter Rindisbacher 2

by Elizabeth Campbell

The young Swiss artist Peter Rindisbacher always practiced his skills using materials at hand. People who knew of his gift and were in a position to supply him with paint often did. He preferred watercolours, and he often sketched in ink his subject prior to completing a painting. Rindisbacher sometimes used these sketches or studies to create several paintings, which he would sell to HBC employees, military or government officials and publishers.

by Elizabeth Campbell The young Swiss artist Peter Rindisbacher always practiced his skills using materials at hand. People who knew of his gift and were in a position to supply him with paint often did. He preferred watercolours, and he often sketched in ink his...